Author Archives: Paul Messa

Finished Basements & Basement Flooding

basement flood restoration in Philadelphia
Basements in homes built prior to the new millennium were typically not designed to be used as additional living space. In most instances, the foundations are not waterproof, and there is no vapor barrier beneath the concrete flooring. The resultant environment generally exists in a state of unreasonably high humidity, and elevated mold spore counts; with a propensity for basement flooding from water infiltration during heavy rains as well as rapid snow melts.

Thermography & Water Damage Restoration

Flood Damage Imaging
Thermal imaging technology has become a staple in the field of water damage restoration. Using infrared technology to evaluate the breadth and degree of saturation in a water damaged structure, gives the water damage restoration professional the ability to rapidly assess water migration over an expansive area. This non-invasive technology delivers a dependable overview of the work area, which can be used to enlighten a property owner or justify job scope to an insurance adjuster.

Frozen Pipes & Water Damage

Frozen pipe water damage
During prolonged periods of subfreezing weather, insufficiently protected water lines can form damaging ice blockages. Water contracts when cooled until reaching approximately 39 degrees Fahrenheit. Expansion commences with further cooling, increasing in volume by approximately 9% when frozen solid.  This transformation from liquid to significantly expanded solid has no outlet in a closed plumbing system and can result in a ruptured water line.

Beware of Fire Chasers

Fire Damage Restoration
Emergency restoration organizations are predominantly run by conscientious professionals who are sympathetic to the plight of their customers.  Unfortunately, there are predatory practitioners eager to exploit victims of disaster that are a pitfall to recognize and to avoid.  Such behavior is most prevalent when armies of malcontents known as ‘fire chasers’ solicit property owners, often before emergency crews have extinguished the fire.

Water Damage Duration & Coverage

Water Damage Restoration
Water damage insurance claims are among the most frequently reported losses. Coverage depends on policy specifics, including the source of water damage and the duration of exposure. It is incumbent upon property owners to ascertain a thorough understanding of possible liabilities, and available policy options to make informed coverage decisions. Current coverages can be replaced entirely or bolstered by adding addendums that would indemnify against eventualities not currently addressed.

Vapor Pressure & Water Mitigation

Water Damage Restoration
Manipulating the environment within a drying chamber is essential to successful water damage restoration. Equipment is deployed to evaporate surface water and create a vapor pressure differential between saturated building materials and dry air. This vapor pressure differential causes trapped water to vaporize and move from the substrate to the air. Achieving an optimal environment for evaporation requires attention to the vapor pressure differential. The bigger the spread of vapor pressure the greater the pull of moisture from the air.

Water Damage vs. Flood Damage

flood damage
Several times a year, monumental rains flood basements causing significant water damage. Unwitting consumers often assume coverage after such an event, only to discover that they are saddled with the financial burden of flood damage restoration. Most homeowner’s insurance policies cover water damage caused by system failures within the home, but virtually every homeowner’s insurance policy has stated exclusions concerning surface water runoff, also known as ground water.

Four Principles of Water Mitigation

Water Mitigation
Humidity, Temperature & Airflow influence the movement of moisture within a material as well as the evaporation rate from the surface of the material and can greatly impact the overall drying time for a water damage restoration project. Quickly reducing moisture in the air and introducing sufficient airflow will reduce water activity, ultimately lowering the potential for microbial activity.
1 2 3 6